Border

Border

Boundaries change, whether in style or location. We need them as much as we need them to be suitable. You separate work from play—not always an easy thing, and sometimes you need to blur that line for the sake of your work. Some separations can be bad, especially if a border becomes a boundary among kin.

Your life borders against others. Crossing over a border can turn a boundary into a highway,opening new friendship, as long as that border remains respected. Friendship that crosses the border is only as honored as much as the friends honor their border.  · · · →

The Long Look Past

The Long Look Past

Look past your own injuries to the greater battle. A soldier may lose a leg, but if he quits, his loss could be for nothing. We can’t always move, we can’t always help. Sometimes the best way to help is to not ask for it.

Look at your own situation, then take a good, long look past it. One of the most important decisions is whether to ask for help. Sometimes it’s better to ask sooner rather than to make more work for friends later. But, if you can suck it up long enough to help someone else, do so.  · · · →

Self-Sacrifice Trumps

Self-Sacrifice Trumps

Sometimes the only way to get needed attention is to make drastic cuts against your own stuff. Steve Jobs sold the museum to help propel Apple into the future. Cortes burned his ships. It wasn’t easy for them and it won’t be easy for you.

You have your own painful self-cuts you must make, sooner or later. We need don’t cut back on our stuff every day, that’s not necessary. But, when the time comes, we always find an excuse—or five—to say, “Not today.”

No, we all must make painful cuts at times. Once we do, we grow.  · · · →

Battle Flow

Battle Flow

Battles never appear as are. Outcomes flow and weave in and out. Currents of war and conflict are so complex—and organic—that no one can know which way events will turn next. All we can do is know the behavior of a river based on history. But, which way what piece of debris will flow this time around—we can’t know.

The unpredictable nature of war should serve as both a caution and an encouragement.  Take no small victory to rationalize overconfidence—though aggressors do anyway. Free people defending home and country find hope knowing storms always precede calm.  · · · →