Thrive in the Midst

Thrive in the Midst

There’s something about life! We call it vibrance. We call it survival instinct. We call it spunk. No living thing is inclined to die quietly, so when life gets violent the living live violently. Whatever the hardship, it’s never the end. Even the Alamo was remembered. Life and death have much more work for us to do before they allow the transition.

Imagine yourself a tree so alive you’re on living fire, so hot from life that the strongest storm can’t get you wet. That’s an accurate picture. Storms can’t wipe out forests; they only water them and feed them.  · · · →

Self Calm-Panic

Self Calm-Panic

All our emotions are self-justified. If we’re angry, it’s someone else’s fault. If we worry, well, we should! If we’re happy, it’s because we deserve it. Emotions are the first stop on the highway to lifelong blame-shifting.

Panic is self-induced—always. Same goes for calm. When the unthinkable happens, which it eventually does, it’s all because we weren’t thinking of it. By training ourselves to count on the world being as we presume it is—then making our emotional stability dependent on that world rather than personal choice—we set ourselves up. Counting on ourselves for emotions might be better.  · · · →

Gambit Your Gambit

Gambit Your Gambit

Victory requires sacrifice. The same is true for even the most menial results. It takes only a short time to set a better tone, improve your frame of mind, or learn a more efficient way. And, it’s worth it.

The trouble is getting the time to make the time. Sometimes we have to carry on with things less than great. We can’t always make the small sacrifice to be more efficient. We can’t always set a better mood. We might need to wait for the time and resources, making do in the meanwhile. That sacrifice is to not sacrifice, yet.  · · · →

Gently Strong

Gently Strong

Holding your ground and being gentle aren’t opposites. No one wants what you have to offer if what you have to offer spells their own doom. As you enforce the rules you live by, don’t require the demise of those who comply, unless you somehow aim to redefine others as rule-breakers—and that’s never a good idea. Just ask King John.

Be gentle as you follow your code. Provide a path to redemption to the lost while upholding general principles that prevent people from getting lost in the first place. In keeping the goal of redemption, you’ll have no problem.  · · · →