When to Act

When to Act

Patience is not the same as ambivalence. Action comes into play after patience has been exhausted. So in a sense, patience is a threat. When someone is being patient with you, action is in the making if you don’t improve.

Action has repercussions. People will retaliate against your own action; patient people will act against your inaction. But the longer you act patiently, the stronger your position. So when you act, act with patience. Then, your position will keep growing stronger. Patience tells when to act: when the road stretches on with patience both behind and in front of you.  · · · →

Vibe Only

Vibe Only

The most important thing you can do is vibe. Thinking happy thoughts all by yourself will do more to change the world than a thousand invitations from the UN. And, that only makes sense if you think about great marketing for a terrible product.

Your contact with people is only as good as you yourself. If you are toxic, then you will be poison to anyone you come across. But, the smell of something sweet can carry through a breeze for miles. If you simply be a truly uplifting person, people will build a road through mountains to find you.  · · · →

Go Ghetto, Go Get ‘Em

Go Ghetto, Go Get ‘Em

There’s a reason nice guys finish last. It can be good to be nice, but niceness is not the only part of a well-balanced character. The will to jump for cash is frowned upon by many moral-minded “better-thans”. So much evil is done in the name of so-called “virtue”. Even the desire to be a good person often cloaks a feeling of superiority.

So, that hesitancy to leap at the chance to make money—was it really, purely virtue? Or, was it a way to feel holier than others while staying inside the comfort zone? Earning money is also virtuous.  · · · →

Keeping the Honesty

Keeping the Honesty

It’s easy to cross the line of deception quickly. When someone makes a promise, then breaks it with a smile, that’s what we call a “clue”. One of the greatest dangers is people who seem to care, while their constant recommendation is to waste time; mealtime is an all time favorite.

Jesus taught his disciples by working together in daily life and chores. Of course they ate together, but how much time do church-goers work together versus eat together? They say they work for some Great Commission; how’s that going? Is it daily chores or wasted chatter as a clue?  · · · →