Don’t Mind

The ability to just not care is almost like a superpower. It sends a message of immovability and confidence, probably in self, but the confidence could be placed in something else—like God. Not caring sends this message for good reason.

Most of us walk around with an inner turmoil—a storm rages within each of us, full of fear, worry, and doubt of someone or something or self. That storm makes us hypersensitive to the normal world around us. So, it is not really life or circumstance we don’t need to mind. The thing we needn’t mind is within.  · · · →

Relearning Trust

Relearning Trust

Trust is difficult. Once trust is broken, it can be nearly impossible to learn to trust again. This opens up two challenges: knowing how to deal with people who refuse to trust and knowing who it actually was who truly, really, broke trust in the first place.

On the matter of dealing with someone with trust issues, it’s best to not compound the problem. Even the smallest thing can trigger an avalanche of self-justification for why that person shouldn’t trust you. Patience is your best bet. On relearning trust, admitting the challenge and accepting friendship are the first two steps.  · · · →

Decentralize Learning

Decentralize Learning

America, as founded by the Pilgrims, began with the idea that all people can learn because all homes can teach. The early colonies were the first society with widespread literacy and critical thought. Somewhere along the line, we decided that learning outside the home was better. We shipped off the kids and went about our business. Learning was no longer a shared responsibility of the family.

Public education brought the benefit of reaching uneducated classes. But, we grew dependent on a crutch. Pilgrim home learning was made possible by the press. With Internet, learning might be able to return home.  · · · →

Heat of the Moment

Heat of the Moment

Those small, flash moments show our true character. Sometimes they prove us worthy. Other times they show us how to improve. After we’ve grown for a while, it can become difficult to find new ways to be better people. All you need is a surprise moment of rage to uncover your next weakness to address.

So, those moments really serve a dual purpose. You’re bound to get something out of how you respond in the heat of the moment. We can take steps to get our minds right, by not mulling over negativity. But, surprises will take us by surprise.  · · · →