Approachability

Approachability

What draws us to certain people? Is it their good looks? Kindness? Accomplishment? Or, the mere fact that we are drawn to people other people are drawn to even though we don’t know why? Ask yourself these questions long enough, and you will find a character cocktail of diligence mixed with respect.

We love people who do whatever they do well. It’s ontological. It’s nature. We all do things, and we all want to do our things well. We also want respect, and we are even happier when we respect others. Anyone good at whatever, including respect, draws us in.  · · · →

What It Means to not Whine

What It Means to not Whine

One of the most impossible lessons of personal growth is about not fixing blame. The specific person and specific circumstance that knocked you down were almost surely wrong, somehow. It might have even been on purpose. But, you must ignore all of that and do nothing but take the next step.

You demonstrate how grown up you are by the size of problems you shrug off. Everything should be no big deal. Don’t ball up into your emotional hideaway and crawl into a bed of blame and shame. Take the next step toward your own progress, not justice for yourself.  · · · →

Plans for Justice Help

Plans for Justice Help

Frustration and angst fester where there is no explanation of a conundrum. One important role of the Supreme Court is to provide judicial opinions—both for the majority ruling and the dissenting. The opinion is almost as important as the ruling itself, perhaps even more. By knowing why the right and wrong things are right and wrong, we codify a precedent to carry out the decision before us and to navigate conundrums in the future.

When you’re frustrated, you might decide to look for a simple opinion. Knowing what to do might only follow knowing what to think about it.  · · · →

LinkedIn Chooses ‘Hong Kong SAR’ for User Experience

Linked-In email

I received this email from LinkedIn this week. LinkedIn is changing how they display the location “Hong Kong” to “Hong Kong SAR”.

“SAR” stands for “Special Administrative Region”. It does not reflect the name of the territory associated with Hong Kong Island known as “Hong Kong”. “SAR” is a classification, identifying Hong Kong similar to how Puerto Rico and Guam fall under the governance of the United States as “unincorporated territories of the United States”.

From an English usage perspective, this is strange. On LinkedIn, a location in California does not display as “California State” nor does Puerto Rico display as “Puerto Rico UTOS”.

This is part of a growing trend of using additional and eccentric wording to describe places somehow associated with China. For example, many companies, especially airlines, are displaying Taiwan as “Taiwan (Province of China)” or similar, even though those companies do not list California as “California (State of USA)”.  · · · →