The Forgotten Diligence

The Forgotten Diligence

The Point

Patience isn’t always recognized. Many mistake patience for slothfulness or wasting time. Time is money, but that doesn’t mean we should always spend it. Good things come to those who wait. When we live in haste we tend to forget the value of patience.

Sometimes patience requires action to create the opportunity to wait for something good. This is called perseverance. Making peace, for example, requires perseverance, before results are anywhere in sight.

While good things come to those who are patient, the best things come to those who persevere. As Jesus said, peacemakers shall be called sons of God.  · · · →

Hard Working Sloths

Hard Working Sloths

The Point

Nothing beats good, old fashion hard work. And nothing reminds us of this more than watching a sloth eat. It even looks exhausted having to chew its own food.

Hard work doesn’t excuse the need for hard thinking. Wicked men are too lazy to work, while hard-working leaders often give unintentional injustice from lack of attention to detail.

Laziness comes in many forms and all of it can lead to one’s failure—even failure to rise in the first place.

Diligence is a good teacher. Does hard work support practical needs or is hard work a practical need in itself?  · · · →

It’s the Practical Things

It’s the Practical Things

The Point

Making rounds, calling to check up on the family business, paying bills, and putting food on the table—these don’t involve much emotion or personal empathy, yet are the reason God is called “God the Provider”.

In the End, rebellious Angels will be despised for their inability to fulfill practical needs, for more than a short time. It’s the reason evil needs to harness good men rather than conquer them. And it’s the reason evil empires of money and military always fail, eventually.

For Angels, prayer is a practical need—one example of how America overlooks many practical, daily needs.  · · · →

Credit Where Due

Credit Where Due

The Point

The biggest complaint I hear against organized Churchianity is the injustice Christians give each other every day. Christians allow scandal after scandal of dominating each other, neglecting needs, disunity, just to name a few.

Inviting non-Christians to join the scandals we harbor will only make future evangelism more difficult—and rightly so.

It’s as if Christians think non-Christians are blind to injustice, as if Christians have the corner on every good idea, and they’re actually surprised at non-Christian brilliance. Evangelism would be faster and easier if Christians plucked the log. But, first, they’d have to give non-Christians some overdue credit.  · · · →