Room in the Road

Room in the Road

Room in the Road

Moderates have tried for millennia to fix everything from economics to religion to politics, even personal relationships. They mean well, but only fail and insult because right and left can’t merge.

There isn’t much room in the middle of the road. Nor can everyone ride the fence.

Some fences keep us safe and give us the the self-imposed limits we need in order to be happy. Other fences should be torn down. No fences should be ridden. Roads are for riding, not standing.

Safe roads need a right and a left with clear lines that aren’t crossed. So do countries.  · · · →

Rules and Rights

Rules and Rights

Rules and Rights

Doing the right thing isn’t always easy. We often want to do something foolish when we feel bad. And, when the consequences of foolishness flourish, we feel even worse. It’s better to practice wisdom, especially when we don’t feel like it.

Right now, the world is focused on rights instead of wisdom—homosexual rights, religious rights, divorced parents’ rights, healthcare rights, welfare rights…

Right now, even when we don’t feel like it, we need responsible mothers and fathers living together, earning money, raising children, electing responsible leaders, and honoring God who designed us accordingly. If we don’t, we’ll feel bad.  · · · →

Jesus and Churchianity

Jesus and Churchianity

Jesus and Churchianity

The “seeker-sensitive” critics got it half right. Hybels was right to make sure that non-Christians could understand his messages. He also made sure that Christians could understand his messages. “Seeker-sensitive” originally sought to answer the questions that normal people ask and use the words that normal people use, instead of only preaching with lofty words to those already convinced.

“Seeker-sensitive” was also a kind of warning. It allowed a small amount of “Church without Jesus”. Non-Christians could go and feel welcome, given the premise that they were seeking. But, what the Church needs and always needed was “Jesus without Churchianity”.  · · · →

Grip

Grip

Grip

A heavy hand isn’t always the strongest. A calloused hand lacks the sensitivity to know what it touches. Justice, war, patience, friendship, and peace require information. Many tyrants blindly bring down their fists on broken glass thinking to crush an egg.

The problem doesn’t come from a failure to check first, but whether to bring one’s hand down at all. One of the key factors of combat is keeping a center of balance. Throwing a punch can offset that balance.

Fingers can feel-out a situation better than a fist. Strong fingers have grip and prove more useful than heavy fists.  · · · →